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Woodworking Useful Links

  • Podcasts

    • FineWoodworking Shop Talk Live Fine Woodworking magazine editors and contributors answer your questions and share woodworking tips and techniques. Click play_circle_filled to listen to an episodecancel

      STL249: MDF on a jointer? - Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

      Bob Van Dyke joins Mike and Ben to discuss story sticks, cooling glue to get more open time, spring joints and admits to milling MDF on his machines! Sponsored by Grizzly Industrial 0:00 - Intro 1:30 - Are woodworking classes tiring? 10:59 - When do you make a story stick? 19:36 - Can you get more open time by cooling your glue? 31:33 - Segments 46:06 - 5 spring joints at once? 58:26 - How deep of a cut do you take on a jointer? 1:04:47 - Bob mills MDF on his machines!!!!!!! Links from this episode can be found here - http://www.shoptalklive.com Sign up for the Fine Woodworking weekly eLetter - https://www.finewoodworking.com/newsletter Sign up for a Fine Woodworking Unlimited membership - https://www.finewoodworking.com/unlimited Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to [email protected] for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.
      1. STL249: MDF on a jointer?
      2. STL248: Best of Shop Talk Live #1
    • The Woodworking Podcast The Woodworking Podcast is a casual conversation about woodworking with host Nick Ferry & Bob Kloes. Discussion is pretty much anything & everything woodworking related. From woodworking tools & equipment, tips & techniques, joinery & methodology, and shop layout. Click play_circle_filled to listen to an episodecancel

      TWP41: Wood Drying & Doors - The Woodworking Podcast

      In this episode we discuss drying wood, seasonal movement, climate changes and interior doors and hinges   https://youtu.be/g0ZlIvBgaLI   Thank you to the following Patreon contributors!: Chris McCoy Tony Cabero Byron younce David Lightman Phil Edwards David Moffitt Chris Capistran Jason Adamczyk Bryan Collette Mike Stange Walrus Dixie Trapper Steve Nelson Jim Beshears John Wilson Black Rainbow Matt Parker
      1. TWP41: Wood Drying & Doors
      2. TWP40 – 8 Million Ways To Skin A Cat
    • Splinters with Gary Rogowski Podcast This podcast series is a look at furniture building from a veteran maker, designer, and author. The episodes are practical, philosophic, witty, and irreverent. Gary was a former contributing editor at Fine Woodworking Magazine and founded The Northwest Woodworking Studio, A School for Woodworkers, in Portland, Oregon in 1997. He has no illusions about the value of this work in today’s culture of fast and furious and disposable. Making art, building furniture, is work that is useless and beautiful, and necessary for those who produce it. Creativity feeds the soul as nothing else can. Click play_circle_filled to listen to an episodecancel

      Which Wood, Why, reprise - Splinters with Gary Rogowski

      1. Which Wood, Why, reprise
      2. Change
    • Wood Talk A light-hearted look at the world of woodworking! A woodworking show for modern woodworkers and makers. Join Marc Spagnuolo, Shannon Rogers, and Matt Cremona for a light-hearted look at the latest news, tips, and tricks from the world of woodworking. Click play_circle_filled to listen to an episodecancel

      511 – Nature is Dumb - Wood Talk | Woodworking

      Micro bevels, cross cut sleds vs miter gauges, veneer glue that won’t kill you….I think, and how much work do to on used tools.
      1. 511 – Nature is Dumb
      2. 510 – Keep Perspective in Perspective
    • Woodshop Life Podcast Bi-weekly Woodworking Podcast. Click play_circle_filled to listen to an episodecancel

      Episode 80 - Do I Really NEED A Large Planer?, Dovetail Tips, Milling Wax Blanks & MUCH More! - Woodshop Life Podcast

      Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/woodshoplife   Sean 1) If I wanted to try my hand at veneering my own panels, what set up process do you recommend? This would be an attempt to do it without diving in and purchasing what I hear you guys talk about as a vacuum bag. Is it even possible to veneer my own panels without a vacuum bag? Matthew 2) Hey guys thanks for a great podcast and for answering questions from all of us.  I have a question about planers.  I am looking to upgrade my lunch box planer to something that is better than what I have now (ridgid 12.5").  I had a 15" planer years ago and am wondering if I "need" a large planer (15-20") or would something like the Dewalt 735 work just fine?  Thanks for your input. Troy   Guy 1) Thanks to you all for the wonderful podcast. Really enjoy the way you discuss our (sometimes dumb) questions with great care. I appended my question to an earlier message, but I don't think it got answered. (If it did, please just re-direct me?) I was finishing up a console made of red oak lately with a couple coats of shellac followed by 3-4 coats of Total Boat Water-Based Poly. Again and again, I'd put on a coat of the poly that looked completely smooth only to come back to what looked like dirty grey raindrops with long tails -- not the look I was going for my beautiful sandy red oak piece! I was using a foam brush to apply. I didn't see any of these trails when I was putting on the finish. And it happened on both horizontal and vertical surfaces I finished. Is this a well known problem with water-based poly? Is it my brushes? But most importantly, is there a way to avoid it? I loathed having to sand it back and reapply. Also, while you're at it, is it worse to finish things vertically rather than horizontally because it the finish might collect and drip down? Thank you for your thoughts! (Oh, and tell Guy that he never needs to apologize for giving his "opinion". Frequently, it's not just an opinion but a position arrived at from lots of expert observation!) Adam Potthast 2) Hey guys, thanks for always producing such great content. My question is about dovetails for beginners. I’ve never done dovetails before, but recently purchased the Leigh through dovetail jig TD330 and am eager to get going. What tips, tricks, and general words of wisdom would you give someone who is just starting to work with dovetails? I know that’s super open-ended so here are a couple specific questions to get the juices flowing- I see that this jig can be used with a handheld router or a router table. Do you have a preferred method when making your dovetails? I’ve also heard people say to buy extra material when starting to work with dovetails, but how much extra? If I’m making a box, should I plan to buy enough materials for 6 sides (basically giving myself 2 extra box sides in case of screw-ups)? Thanks again for all the great shows. I’ve learned so much from you guys and really appreciate it. Billy   Huy 1) Hey guys! Quick question - I like to resaw turning blanks to make small boxes and they often come covered in wax (or something). When I receive them, should I scrape off the wax immediately and let them acclimate to the shop? Or wait until I'm ready to mill them? Also, what's the best way to do that? I was thinking skim-cuts on the table saw. Thanks!! Dan 2) Which type of router would you suggest for fitting to a router table? I imagine that if I buy a plunge or fixed type and mount it to a table and I can always take it out and use it handheld etc but with a motor body I can leave it set up and just purchase a plunge type as well ( more tools is always a good thing) -Geoff  
      1. Episode 80 - Do I Really NEED A Large Planer?, Dovetail Tips, Milling Wax Blanks & MUCH More!
      2. Episode 79 – The ULTIMATE Bench?, L-Fence's Are All The Rage, Beginner Projects & MUCH More!
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